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AERA/IEL Education Policy Forum Luncheon
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AERA/IEL Education Policy Forum Luncheon

You are invited to the AERA/IEL Education Policy Forum Luncheon featuring Margaret J. Maaka, Kamaki Kanahele, and the Kūpuna (Elders) of the Dr. Agnes Cope Native Hawaiian Traditional Healing Center of the Waiʻanae Coast, Hawaiʻi. The event is on Thursday, October 19th, 12-2 pm at IEL.

 Export to Your Calendar 10/19/2017
When: Thursday, October 19th
12:00-2:00 PM
Where: Institute for Educational Leadership
4301 Connecticut Avenue
Suite 100
Washington, District of Columbia  20008
United States
Contact: Sarah McCann
202 822 8405 x138

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You are invited to the Education Policy Forum Luncheon featuring:

 

Margaret J. Maaka, 

Kamaki Kanahele, and the Kūpuna (Elders) of the Dr. Agnes Cope Native Hawaiian Traditional Healing Center of the Waiʻanae Coast, Hawaiʻi

 

           Using Indigenous Frameworks to Build Community Capability

 

        Thursday, October 19th, 12-2 pm

 

                     Location: IEL, 4301 Connecticut Avenue NW, Suite 100, Washington DC, 20008

                     Fifteen dollars for the subsidized lunch will be collected at the door (cash or check only).

 

 

RSVP by October 16th 

 

Abstract

The pēpeha “Ānō me he whare pūngāwerewere. As though it were a spiderweb. A compliment for a fine piece of work such as weaving or carving.” (Mead & Grove, 2001, p. 17) calls attention to the artistry and intricacy involved in the weaving of a web. This imagery highlights the interwoven and configurational elements of fine silken strands that make up a creation wondrous to behold.

The spider and web analogy encapsulates several inter-related ideas, practices, and perceptions relating to indigenous community development. These will be highlighted in the presentation—the complexity of culture (the integration and validity of cultural norms within educational developments); the complexity of partnerships (the nature of the participants and their ability to obtain deep understandings of the unique contexts in which they work), the complexity associated with the work (especially the need to protect and survive in hostile environments), and most important, the complexity of consequence (the outcomes of the partnership work).

Mead, H. M., & Grove, N. (2001). Ngā pēpeha a ngā tīpuna. Wellington, NZ: Victoria University Press.

 

About the Author

Margaret J. Maaka (Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāi Tahu, Ngāti Awa) is a professor of education at the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa where she received her PHD in Educational Psychology.

Margie is Director of the Ho‘okulāiwi: Center for Native Hawaiian and Indigenous Education (the educational arm of the Hokupili Foundation and a university/native Hawaiian community partnership). She is co-founder of the AERA’s Indigenous Peoples of the Pacific Special Interest Group and currently serves as the Chair of the AERA Executive Committee for Special Interest Groups. She also serves on the International Research Advisory Board of the Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga Center of Research Excellence.

Margie is interested in the preparation of indigenous leaders in education. Her research interests include community partnerships, educational psychology/ indigenous educational psychology, indigenous development and advancement, educational policy, multi-literacies, and language and cognitive development. 

 

Required reservations may be made online by Monday, October 16th.
Limited available seating is assigned according to the order in which reservations are received. Fifteen dollars for the subsidized lunch will be collected at the door (cash or check only).

Contact Us at 4301 Connecticut Ave, NW, Suite 100 | Washington, DC 20008 | 202-822-8405 | epfp@iel.org

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